Today I Learned

A few items I've learned recently.

  1. Third party candidates sometimes help elect their least favorite officials

    In the US election of 1844, pro-slavery Democratic candidate James Polk ran against Whig Henry Clay. Although Clay was a slave holder himself, he was against expansion of slavery in the West. The third party candidate James G. Birney of the anti-slavery Liberty Party siphoned enough votes away from Clay to get Polk elected.

    Interestingly Joseph Smith and Brigham Young ran in the election of 1842.

  2. Some languages have no words for "left" and "right"

    Guugu Yimithirr has no words for "left" or "right". Instead they use the cardinal directions, like "Look at the animal to your North".

  3. Some languages have no words for "yes" and "no"

    Some Celtic languages like Irish have no words for "yes" and "no". Instead they use an "echo" response. For the affirmative, simply repeat the verb "Got milk?", "Got". For the negative, preface the verb with a negative, "Got milk?", "Not got".

    The same is true in Biblical Hebrew. When King David asks "Is the child dead?", the servants reply, "Dead". Ancient Hebrew had a word for "no", but not "yes".

  4. The term 'soda water' for carbonated beverages, like Dr. Pepper, may be from the European practice of adding sodium bicarbonate to these drinks to help with indigestion.
  5. Cupid gave Harpocrates, the Greek god of Silence, a rose to insure Cupid's mother Aphrodite's many indiscretions would be kept quiet. This is the origin of our word "sub rosa" meaning to keep secret or quiet. Roses were carved into banquet hall roofs to signify that the wild things that happened would be "sub rosa". A medieval form of "What happens in Vegas, stays in Vegas." (It is just a coincidence that Harpo Marx never spoke - although Gracho claimed Harpo was named after Harpocrates, Harpo was named for playing the harp.)
  6. People born blind do not suffer from schizophrenia, but losing sight later in life increases the chance of schizophrenia.
  7. A portmanteau is a merging of two words to create another, like combining fan and magazine to yield fanzine.
  8. The naming of Pluto

    In 1930, 11-year-old Venetia Burney Phair enters a contest to name the recently discovered 9th planet. Her suggestion, Pluto, is selected unanimously by the Lowell Observatory, which makes sense since Pluto was a Roman god name. It didn't hurt that her entry started with "pl" which just happens to be the initials of the famous astronomer, Percival Lowell.

    Oddly enough her great-uncle named two other solar system bodies, the moons of Mars: Phobos and Deimos. Not many people get to name solar system objects and I'm sure they didn't planet that way, but the odds against two related people naming major heavenly bodies are astronomical.

  9. Iron horseshoes were used as money during the 12th Century.
  10. Race horses are sometimes equipped with lighter aluminum shoes.